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Education Resources on Disability Issues

Ensuring children with disabilities receive the education and training they need to succeed is vitally important. Nationally, only 65 percent of students with disabilities graduate high school each year compared to 86 percent of student without disabilities. That means there is 21-point gap in outcomes. Furthermore, only seven percent of students with disabilities graduate college. As such, educators have a critical role to play in empowering more students with disabilities to succeed.

Teachers are important partners in the efforts to overcome bias, barriers and stigmas by promoting and implementing best practices in the classroom. Below you will find resources to teach students about disability and assist students with disabilities to succeed. You also will find recommended reading for both children and adults.

Teacher Resources:

  • ADA 25thAnniversary ToolkitThis website provides a background on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) legislation, its purpose and history. It also covers other legislation regarding rights for people with disabilities.
  • ADL Curriculum ConnectionsThe Anti- Defamation League provides lesson plans surrounding all aspects of people with disabilities for all grade levels. This curriculum seeks to challenge the myths and stereotypes that surround people with disabilities.
  • A Measure of Perceived Stigma in People with Intellectual Disability – The stigma of intellectual disability is often neglected by health professionals and researchers. Qualitative research has shown that people with intellectual disabilities are aware of the stigma of their disability and its social consequences.
  • Born This Way Teacher’s Guide The Emmy award winning show Born this Way features the lives, loves and experiences of seven young adults with Down syndrome. A&E has prepared a detailed viewing guide about the stigmas that society places on people with disabilities and various ways that the show tries to overcome those barriers with an inclusive, racially diverse message.
  • The Disability Rights MovementThis lesson plan provides discussion topics, journal questions and a reading to teach your class about the ADA and the role people with disabilities played in its implementation, success and progress. The reading also discusses disability by focusing on the ability of the individual and using people first language.
  • How to Have an Inclusive Prom – This guide for school dance organizers includes an introduction to the challenges and opportunities, tips for promotion, a checklist for securing accessible facilities and a sample non-discrimination policy for school boards.
  • Judy Heumann movie – Samuel Habib made this video for his final history and English project on the American Dream and the disability rights movement.
  • Kids Included Together (KIT) – KIT strives to help the world see the ability in every child. KIT helps others meaningfully include kids with disabilities through inclusion training, policy development and sharing best practices. KIT has created several free inclusion resources including videos, tip sheets, checklists and booklets.
  • Museum of disABILITY History: Educational ResourcesThis site provides extensive lessons plans, with worksheets and readings, on the history of people with disabilities, including the ADA of 1990. The lesson plans based off of the New York State curriculum also includes quizzes and other resources for different age groups.
  • Understanding Our Differences – UOD offers disability awareness education programs to third through fifth grade students, with the goal of ensuring that all children understand from an early age that people with disabilities should be respected and included.
  • Sesame Street ToolkitWith Julia’s introduction to the cast, Sesame Street can be a great way to talk about disability issues. Julia is a child with autism and openly talks about her experiences in a way that children can understand. Their website showcases many different lessons for young children.
  • Special Olympics Unified Champion Schools – This website is dedicated to the Unified Champion Schools program that builds on Special Olympics’ values, principles, practices, experiences and impacts to shape a generation that welcomes everyone. This programming promotes social inclusion in schools to ensure special education and general education students are equitably engaged.
  • Special Olympics Unified Champion Schools High School Playbook – This resource provides many tips and resources to make high schools socially inclusive.
  • Special Olympics Unified Physical Education Resource – This resource contains information that can be used in a physical education curriculum.
  • Stigma and Intellectual Disability: A Review of Related Measures and Future Directions – The theoretical construct of stigma has received much attention in psychiatric disability research, leading to the development of widely used measures to assess stigma change. The study of stigma has not received the much attention for people with intellectual disabilities. This manuscript evaluates existing measures of intellectual disability stigma through a systematic review of the literature.
  • Teaching ToleranceTeaching Tolerance showcases the shared struggles and the intersectionality shard by people with disabilities and African Americans. This includes lesson plans for elementary, middle and high school students.
  • Who I Am OutreachThis toolkit talks about people with disabilities living life in various roles. Produced by the U.S. Department of Labor Office of Disability Employment Policy, this toolkit includes videos and stories about people with disabilities.

Historical Resources:

Universal Design Resources:

  • CASTCAST is a nonprofit education and development organization that works to expand learning opportunities for all individuals through Universal Design for Learning.
  • Making Sense of Universal Design for LearningThis is a great video that explains how Universal Design for Learning can be incorporated into the classroom.
  • Meet the Normals – Adventure in Universal DesignThis is an animated short that focuses on the process and challenges of universal design.
  • UDL CenterThe Center for Universal Design for Learning serves as a hub where teachers from all over can share tips, resources and other great tools, which helps spread Universal Design in the classroom. In addition, the site hosts an online version of Universal Design for Learning by David Gordon, Anne Meyer and David Rose.
  • UDL Credentialing and Certification Initiative – This website is an initiative to develop a Universal Design for Learning (UDL) credentialing and certification process to recognize best practices in education program design, product development and classroom instruction.
  • Understood.orgThis hub possesses great resources for caretakers trying to figure how to navigate the education system. There are tips on how to ensure a universally accessible classroom on the site.

Resources for College Students with Disabilities:

  • Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD) – AHEAD is a professional membership organization for individuals involved in the development of policy and in the provision of quality services to meet the needs of persons with disabilities involved in all areas of higher education.
  • Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability (CPED) – For more than 25 years, the Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability (CPED) has been a national leader in promoting access to postsecondary education for students with disabilities. Their work combines research-based evidence and professional training to inform the field and advance postsecondary education opportunities for students.
  • Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology (DO-IT) – The DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) Center is dedicated to empowering people with disabilities through technology and education. It promotes awareness and accessibility—in both the classroom and the workplace—to maximize the potential of individuals with disabilities and make our communities more vibrant, diverse and inclusive.
  • Disability Rights, Education Activism and Mentoring (DREAM) – DREAM (Disability Rights, Education Activism, and Mentoring) is a national organization for and by college students with disabilities. DREAM advocated for disability culture, community and pride, and hopes to serve as an online virtual disability cultural center for students who want to connect with other students. They are supported by sponsoring organization National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) and based at the Association on Higher Education And Disability (AHEAD).
  • Guide to College with Asperger’s and Autism – Transitioning to college can be stressful for any young adult, but those with Asperger’s syndrome or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often face additional challenges during this time. There are people and programs in place to help, though. This guide offers information, expert advice and resources to help make the transition to college smooth and successful for students with ASD and their families.
  • Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Disability Consortium – This project involved a group of colleagues working in disability services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Predominantly Black Colleges and Universities (PBCUs), working in partnership with the Taishoff Center at Syracuse University. They worked to identify strategies for providing culturally responsive disability services and classroom instruction to Black and African American college students with disabilities on all campuses, while also trying to increase the number of Black and African American students with disabilities graduating from college and graduate schools.
  • Mason LIFE Program – The Mason LIFE Program is an innovative post-secondary program at George Mason University for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities who desire a university experience in a supportive academic environment.
  • National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) – The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) is a federally funded project under the U.S. Department of Education (P116D150005), through the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE). NCCSD’s home is at the Association on Higher Education And Disability (AHEAD).
  • 2017 NBCUniversal Tony Coelho Media Scholarship – Thanks to a contribution from NBCUniversal, the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) offers scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students with disabilities who are interested in pursuing a career in the communications, media or the entertainment industry. Recipients will receive $5,625 to help cover the cost of education at their current college or university.
  • Study Tips for College Students with Dyslexia and Dysgraphia – This guide defines and explores three of the most common learning disabilities among college students: dyslexia, dysgraphia and dyscalculia. Additionally, it provides actionable strategies, expert tips and resources for sharing disabilities with instructors, learning in the classroom as well as preparing for and taking exams.
  • Think College – Think College is a national organization dedicated to developing, expanding and improving inclusive higher education options for people with intellectual disabilities. With a commitment to equity and excellence, Think College supports evidence-based and student centered research and practice by generating and sharing knowledge, guiding institutional change, informing public policy, and engaging with students, professionals and families.
  • College for Students With Disabilities Guide – This guide from Maryville University Online covers educational opportunities, preparation steps, knowing your rights, different types of disabilities, and recommended resources for additional information.
  • Graduate School Success for Students With Disabilities – This guide provides both educational and financial resources to people with disabilities to succeed in graduate school. It includes an extensive list of scholarships, advice from an expert in the field, a Q&A with common questions and concerns, and additional funding resources.
  • Resources for Students With Disabilities – This guide was created to bring awareness to rights and responsibilities of students with disabilities, help them learn how to take advantage of myriad services, and provide expert advice from a postsecondary education administrator who has spent years serving college students with disabilities.
  • Financial Aid for College Students with Disabilities – College can be expensive for anyone, but it can be especially costly for those with disabilities. This guide focuses on funding options for students with disabilities, with the goal of helping them find the resources they need to pay for and succeed in college.

Background Reading Resources:

  • BookshareBookshare is an accessible online library for individuals with print disabilities, with free memberships available for qualified students and schools. This can be a great resource in the classroom for students with print disabilities with over 200,000 titles on the site.
  • Books Written by People with DisabilitiesThis site lists books that are written by and are about people with disabilities, most being true stories. They offer insight into the lives of people with disabilities and can be used in classroom discussions or book reports.
  • Disability in Kid LiteratureDisability in Kid Lit looks for and reviews disability representation in children’s literature. Their contributors are people with disabilities who love literature and want to help.
  • Goodreads Shelf on People with DisabilitiesThis site lists popular novels in which the protagonist or other major characters have disabilities.

Recommended Reading for Children:

  • Glatzer, Jenna. Taking Down Syndrome to School (Special Kids in School) (JayJo Books, 2002). Picture book about what it is like to have Down syndrome in school. Appropriate for children in elementary school.
  • Ling, Nancy Tupper. My Sister, Alicia May (Pleasant St. Press, 2009). What it’s like to grow up with a sister with Down syndrome. Appropriate for children in first to third grade.
  • Llano, Gabriella and Tiziana Vazquez. In My World: Down Syndrome (AuthorHouse, 2013). With the support of her family, a girl with Down syndrome lives her life and learns to accept being herself. Appropriate for children in elementary school.
  • Nuenke, Susan K. Popping Wheelies Coloring Book, Volume 1 (Popping Wheelies LLC, 2014). Coloring book featuring drawings of kids with physical disabilities. Appropriate for children in elementary school.
  • Palacio, R.J. Wonder (Knopf Books for Young Readers, 2012). A story about a boy born with facial defects. Appropriate for children ages 8 to 12.
  • Paticoff, Melanie. Sophie’s Tales: Overcoming Obstacles (Sophie’s Tales, 2012). A dog with a cochlear implant meets Champ, another dog who wears glasses, and they talk about disability. Appropriate for children ages 3 to 10.
  • Robinson Peete, Holly and Ryan Elizabeth Peete. My Brother Charlie (Scholastic Press, 2010). Story told from the point of view of the twin sister of a boy on the autism spectrum. Appropriate for children in kindergarten to second grade.
  • Stuve-Bodeen, Stephanie. We’ll Paint the Octopus Red (Woodbine House, 1998). A six-year-old girl learns how to be a good big sister to a baby brother with Down syndrome. Appropriate for children in kindergarten to third grade.
  • Woloson, Eliza. My Friend Isabelle (Woodbine House, 2003). Story of a friendship when one of the friends has Down syndrome. Appropriate for children in kindergarten to second grade.

Recommended Reading for Adults:

  • Davis, Lennard J. Enabling Acts: The Hidden Story of How the Americans with Disabilities Act Gave the Largest US Minority Its Rights (Beacon Press, 2015). A gripping and nuanced telling of the behind-the-scenes efforts to pass the Americans with Disabilities Act.
  • Shapiro, Joseph P. No Pity: People with Disabilities Forging a New Civil Rights Movement (Broadway Books, 1994). An historical, in-depth look at people with disabilities. The book also takes a close look at the advocacy efforts that led to the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act.
  • Solomon, Andrew. Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity (Scribner, 2012). A deeply touching look at how parents and children can learn to accept and embrace differences. The people featured in this book demonstrate how lives with extreme challenges also have extreme value.

Do you know other people or organizations that should be included as a resource?

Contact our Communications Director at laurena@respectability.org.

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